Baby is not 'disabled enough' for benefits

Leah Cato with seven-month-old Max who was born with Hirschsprung’s disease which severely affects his bowel. She has been told that he does not qualify for Disability Living Allowance

Leah Cato with seven-month-old Max who was born with Hirschsprung’s disease which severely affects his bowel. She has been told that he does not qualify for Disability Living Allowance

First published in News thisisoxfordshire: Photograph of the Author by

THE mother of a baby who will be incontinent for the rest of his life has been told he is currently not disabled enough for benefits.

Seven-month-old Max Royan was born with Hirschsprung’s disease which severely affects his bowel.

As a result of a series of operations he will always be faecally incontinent.

At the moment Max, from Garsington, has a colostomy bag, but after an operation within the next few months, mother Leah Cato said she has been told he will need more than 30 nappy changes a day.

The average baby will go through around eight changes a day.

Ms Cato, who also has two healthy daughters, said she applied for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to help with the costs of extra nappies and special creams for her baby son but was told that even after the operation he would be no more disabled than any other baby his age.

She said: “I have had two children before Max and I know he is not ‘just the same as any other baby’.

“The operation will leave Max completely incontinent. He will always be incontinent.

“The consultant has said he will constantly need changing, and will also be very sore so will need special creams which don’t come cheap. He also has special dietary requirements.

“To look at him you would think he is like any other healthy baby.

“But he isn’t.”

Hirschsprung’s disease usually affects sufferers by causing an obstruction in the bowel.

But in Max’s case – total colon Hirschsprung’s – his other complications and surgery will mean he will be unable to control his bowel movements at all.

Ms Cato, 32, said any additional money from the DLA would help the family.

She added that without DLA support she cannot apply for a carer’s allowance, which would allow her to be able to care for her son full- time.

She is due to return to work soon and cannot afford to pay for a specialist nursery which could care for her son.

A Department for Works and Pensions spokesman said Disability Living Allowance was not generally paid on the condition someone has, but because they have specific care and mobility needs.

He added: “All young children have care and mobility needs but parents can claim DLA for children who need a lot more help or supervision than other children of the same age.

“Anyone who disagrees with a decision can ask the department to look at the case again, presenting any new evidence, or appeal the decision.”

Ms Cato said she and her partner would be appealing.

Sara Jones, from Wigan, set up CHAMPS (Curing Hirschsprung’s And Making Positive Steps) after her own son Jacob, now five, was diagnosed. She said: “DLA for Hirschsprung’s is so hit and miss.

“It is very hard for people to prove it’s a disability.

“Life became much easier for us when we were approved for it.

“It’s easy for them to say your child is not disabled, but they don’t see your child screaming blue murder each night because they need constant changing and they’re in pain.

“I know people who have to go through 50 nappies a day.”

About the condition:

Hirschsprung’s is a life-threatening, congenital condition where the nerve supply of an area of the bowel has not developed properly

This causes a blockage of the large intestine due to improper muscle movement in the bowel.

Usually discovered either within the first few days or weeks of birth, the condition is rare and only occurs in about one in 5,000 children.
Treatment to remove the diseased bowel can make the sufferer incontinent.

Comments (19)

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1:29pm Thu 30 Aug 12

xjohnx says...

Claiming benefits ahead of the operations is not allowed by law.The claim should be made after the outcome of the operation is known.

The cost of nappies and medicinal creams will be met by the NHS, not the benefit agencies.

In this country, parents are expected take care of babes in arms. As the child grows, benefits will become payable.

This lady should contact the CAB for proper advice.
Claiming benefits ahead of the operations is not allowed by law.The claim should be made after the outcome of the operation is known. The cost of nappies and medicinal creams will be met by the NHS, not the benefit agencies. In this country, parents are expected take care of babes in arms. As the child grows, benefits will become payable. This lady should contact the CAB for proper advice. xjohnx
  • Score: 3

2:29pm Thu 30 Aug 12

Feelingsmatter says...

I was turned down first time for DLA on behalf of my son. My social worker told me this always happens. I reapplied and qualified for the highest level with absolutely NO changes in my application. I also agree with xjohnx, that there is no way she can get any kind of benefit until the operation has been completed. Sounds like she's been given poor advice. While this awful disease will certainly mean her child qualifies for DLA in the future the powers that be have a point when they say that at the moment he hasn't got any needs which differ from those that other babies have, but if, when her maternity leave ends she is unable to get day care for him, things change. Unfortunately I think she has jumped the gun slightly with her application, but this does't means he won't be successful in the future. Good luck to her.
I was turned down first time for DLA on behalf of my son. My social worker told me this always happens. I reapplied and qualified for the highest level with absolutely NO changes in my application. I also agree with xjohnx, that there is no way she can get any kind of benefit until the operation has been completed. Sounds like she's been given poor advice. While this awful disease will certainly mean her child qualifies for DLA in the future the powers that be have a point when they say that at the moment he hasn't got any needs which differ from those that other babies have, but if, when her maternity leave ends she is unable to get day care for him, things change. Unfortunately I think she has jumped the gun slightly with her application, but this does't means he won't be successful in the future. Good luck to her. Feelingsmatter
  • Score: 1

3:34pm Thu 30 Aug 12

sandra2012 says...

As a mother of a child with hirschsprungs I can tell you that her son does require more care and attention than a 'normal' baby of the same age.up until my son had his op he was having 2-3 rectal washouts per day and dialitations.equipme
nt is costly.also he was in and out of hospital a lot.this is costly as you have to pay for parking and meals.then theres the different medications he needed.again costly.in my opinion she should be given the payment.I didn't receive any payment for my son (I live in Ireland) but if I had it would have really helped.
As a mother of a child with hirschsprungs I can tell you that her son does require more care and attention than a 'normal' baby of the same age.up until my son had his op he was having 2-3 rectal washouts per day and dialitations.equipme nt is costly.also he was in and out of hospital a lot.this is costly as you have to pay for parking and meals.then theres the different medications he needed.again costly.in my opinion she should be given the payment.I didn't receive any payment for my son (I live in Ireland) but if I had it would have really helped. sandra2012
  • Score: 2

3:57pm Thu 30 Aug 12

Myron Blatz says...

Could do worse than contacting MP Andrew Smith.
Could do worse than contacting MP Andrew Smith. Myron Blatz
  • Score: 2

4:55pm Thu 30 Aug 12

matthewsmum says...

We have a son who is 5 and has Hirschsprung's. Someone that looks at these applications had no idea that extra time that this adds to the time and patience when looking after children. Our son has no colon and only a small part of his small intestine working. We have had to cope with an illeostomy for 3 years, TPN for one year, and so much more. There is also the time that it takes to go to and stay in hospitals, and that makes parents unreliable for working. I think that they should reapply, and all of us parents should carry on raising awareness of Hirschsprungs so that "people" who make these decisions are no so ignorant of the disease. Makes my blood boil!!
We have a son who is 5 and has Hirschsprung's. Someone that looks at these applications had no idea that extra time that this adds to the time and patience when looking after children. Our son has no colon and only a small part of his small intestine working. We have had to cope with an illeostomy for 3 years, TPN for one year, and so much more. There is also the time that it takes to go to and stay in hospitals, and that makes parents unreliable for working. I think that they should reapply, and all of us parents should carry on raising awareness of Hirschsprungs so that "people" who make these decisions are no so ignorant of the disease. Makes my blood boil!! matthewsmum
  • Score: 7

5:08pm Thu 30 Aug 12

flowers68 says...

As a mother with an 11 year old with Hirschsprung's and a husband with Hirschsprungs, the extra time and money that this disease costs is outrageouse. Example: husband~bandaids ,catheters , surgerie, med trips,parking,medica
tion (just to name a few) Son ~ diapers,creams, colostomy bags flanges iliostomy bags flanges, long distance Doc appointiments, surgeries, (not to mention, 9 years of washing childs bedding down every morning: having to pay for a tutour for child because he is way behind in school as a result of constantly waking up in the middle of the night in a mess, entrocolitis,bowel obstructions, ect.... so I do not believe that anyone in their right mind could say these children r the same a a child without Hirschsprung's...... further more us hd parents work so hard to make them appear normal. Just cause a person can't see the disabilitie does not mean its not their! All the best and this baby will require way more expenses then a healthy child, the family should push for this as a baby cause every week the family has to come up with the extra money and if they can't the child is the one to suffer!
As a mother with an 11 year old with Hirschsprung's and a husband with Hirschsprungs, the extra time and money that this disease costs is outrageouse. Example: husband~bandaids ,catheters , surgerie, med trips,parking,medica tion (just to name a few) Son ~ diapers,creams, colostomy bags flanges iliostomy bags flanges, long distance Doc appointiments, surgeries, (not to mention, 9 years of washing childs bedding down every morning: having to pay for a tutour for child because he is way behind in school as a result of constantly waking up in the middle of the night in a mess, entrocolitis,bowel obstructions, ect.... so I do not believe that anyone in their right mind could say these children r the same a a child without Hirschsprung's...... further more us hd parents work so hard to make them appear normal. Just cause a person can't see the disabilitie does not mean its not their! All the best and this baby will require way more expenses then a healthy child, the family should push for this as a baby cause every week the family has to come up with the extra money and if they can't the child is the one to suffer! flowers68
  • Score: 5

5:27pm Thu 30 Aug 12

Max's mum says...

I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story.
My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting.
He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night.
How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool.
He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this.
Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby.
I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story. My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting. He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night. How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool. He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this. Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby. Max's mum
  • Score: 1

5:55pm Thu 30 Aug 12

a hd nana says...

as a nana to a little boy who has hirschsprungs if you or the dla have never lived through 1 day with these special children then you cannot make any judgements on their 24 hr care, today my daughter has had to deal with at least 6 leaking bags and as a result his skin is so sore it is an horrendous painful procedure and the amount of bedding and clothes that have to be thrown away or washed numerous times a day is unbelievable and also this could well carry on all night these kids need the extra financial help it is about time hirschsprungs familes had their say x
as a nana to a little boy who has hirschsprungs if you or the dla have never lived through 1 day with these special children then you cannot make any judgements on their 24 hr care, today my daughter has had to deal with at least 6 leaking bags and as a result his skin is so sore it is an horrendous painful procedure and the amount of bedding and clothes that have to be thrown away or washed numerous times a day is unbelievable and also this could well carry on all night these kids need the extra financial help it is about time hirschsprungs familes had their say x a hd nana
  • Score: 3

7:50pm Thu 30 Aug 12

karen moon says...

I have a 12year old son who has Hirschsprungs diseases.he has a colostomy.i help Graham through out the day and night to change him help him shower,and change him and change his bedding through the night.Graham was on high rate DLA and i had to fill the forms out and was told Graham is able to do all changes through the day and night and change bedding to because he is 12.i sent a letter in explaining what i do and why Graham needs this help.stoma nurse ,school done a letter to but it was a waist of time getting through to them because they said Hirsprungs disease is not that bad because Graham now has a stoma and its just a normal stoma.so now Grahams gone from high rate care to low rate care.i went to the appeal service and still got told Graham is only able to reseve low rate because of his age and he does,n get that maney changes and is not up most of the night in pain.now i don't know what to do.
I have a 12year old son who has Hirschsprungs diseases.he has a colostomy.i help Graham through out the day and night to change him help him shower,and change him and change his bedding through the night.Graham was on high rate DLA and i had to fill the forms out and was told Graham is able to do all changes through the day and night and change bedding to because he is 12.i sent a letter in explaining what i do and why Graham needs this help.stoma nurse ,school done a letter to but it was a waist of time getting through to them because they said Hirsprungs disease is not that bad because Graham now has a stoma and its just a normal stoma.so now Grahams gone from high rate care to low rate care.i went to the appeal service and still got told Graham is only able to reseve low rate because of his age and he does,n get that maney changes and is not up most of the night in pain.now i don't know what to do. karen moon
  • Score: -1

9:29pm Thu 30 Aug 12

Myron Blatz says...

I wonder if official rulings on this differ from County to County? Quite often there seems to be a 'postcode lottery' and response by health and support agencies seems to vary. Have any other readers found this to be the case?
I wonder if official rulings on this differ from County to County? Quite often there seems to be a 'postcode lottery' and response by health and support agencies seems to vary. Have any other readers found this to be the case? Myron Blatz
  • Score: -2

9:38pm Thu 30 Aug 12

A Hirschsprung's Mummy says...

This child, like mine, will be going through a series of operations to remove the affected part of the bowel. There isn't a cure, only surgical management, as it is not possible to fully remove all of the Hirschsprung’s Disease. Problems can continue despite life-saving surgery - Hirschsprung’s is a life long condition. Even once the majority of the non-working bowel is taken away there are often ongoing issues. The child may still suffer persistent stooling abnormalities e.g. diarrhea, constipation, incontinence. Infants and toddlers may develop severe nappy rash, and toilet training may take a lot longer. Children often must learn how to use the muscles of the anus after surgery. Some children may leak stool for a while, but most will learn to have better bowel control as they get older. Children may need help going to the toilet, and help in a school environment. Some children may also experience repeated episodes of a serious life threatening condition called Hirschsprung's Enterocolitis – an associated inflammation of the bowel. Mucus in a normal person's gut contains antibodies to help destroy viruses and bacteria, however patients with Hirschsprung’s can also have an abnormal mucous composition, which can affect their immunity. Sometimes medicines/treatment are needed to help with some of these problems e.g. rectal washouts, laxatives, and suppositories, and even further surgery. Taking all this in to account, how is life for these children normal?!
Also, to address the first couple of comments - this mother is caring for a child who has HAD operations and will require more. It's a long process which spans over months: Biopsy tests to confirm the disease; irrigations; for Children that weren’t diagnosed at birth a Stoma is created so that the good bowel has time to recover from being severely stretched due to being backed up with poop because the section with Hirschsprung's couldn't push it along; followed by a major and lengthy operation to actually remove the affected bowel, which for some involves a significant amount. This lady's little boy currently has a Stoma which means the child requires specialist care that is extremely time consuming so to say the little boy hasn't got any needs which differ from those of other babies is ludicrous.
The children affected by this condition are very brave little souls indeed and they, along with us parents caring for them, deserve support. Sadly as it's a rare condition the lack of awareness and understanding often means that it’s a battle to get help. Fortunately we were granted DLA (middle rate) on first application (my boy currently has an Ileostomy). Leah - appeal and I’m sure upon review the right decision will be made. Good luck x
This child, like mine, will be going through a series of operations to remove the affected part of the bowel. There isn't a cure, only surgical management, as it is not possible to fully remove all of the Hirschsprung’s Disease. Problems can continue despite life-saving surgery - Hirschsprung’s is a life long condition. Even once the majority of the non-working bowel is taken away there are often ongoing issues. The child may still suffer persistent stooling abnormalities e.g. diarrhea, constipation, incontinence. Infants and toddlers may develop severe nappy rash, and toilet training may take a lot longer. Children often must learn how to use the muscles of the anus after surgery. Some children may leak stool for a while, but most will learn to have better bowel control as they get older. Children may need help going to the toilet, and help in a school environment. Some children may also experience repeated episodes of a serious life threatening condition called Hirschsprung's Enterocolitis – an associated inflammation of the bowel. Mucus in a normal person's gut contains antibodies to help destroy viruses and bacteria, however patients with Hirschsprung’s can also have an abnormal mucous composition, which can affect their immunity. Sometimes medicines/treatment are needed to help with some of these problems e.g. rectal washouts, laxatives, and suppositories, and even further surgery. Taking all this in to account, how is life for these children normal?! Also, to address the first couple of comments - this mother is caring for a child who has HAD operations and will require more. It's a long process which spans over months: Biopsy tests to confirm the disease; irrigations; for Children that weren’t diagnosed at birth a Stoma is created so that the good bowel has time to recover from being severely stretched due to being backed up with poop because the section with Hirschsprung's couldn't push it along; followed by a major and lengthy operation to actually remove the affected bowel, which for some involves a significant amount. This lady's little boy currently has a Stoma which means the child requires specialist care that is extremely time consuming so to say the little boy hasn't got any needs which differ from those of other babies is ludicrous. The children affected by this condition are very brave little souls indeed and they, along with us parents caring for them, deserve support. Sadly as it's a rare condition the lack of awareness and understanding often means that it’s a battle to get help. Fortunately we were granted DLA (middle rate) on first application (my boy currently has an Ileostomy). Leah - appeal and I’m sure upon review the right decision will be made. Good luck x A Hirschsprung's Mummy
  • Score: 1

11:57pm Thu 30 Aug 12

Summer83 says...

I claimed before my sons second op and was awarded so that has nothing to do with the outcome. As well as all the above comments bedding and clothes that are stained need replacing, electric because you have washing machine on day and night to try and keep everything stain free. It use to take me most of the night to clean explosive stool shower or bath my son and after more pain relief settle him as he was in pain worse then colic,teething then you would have to deal with that on top. nhs won't provide nappies until your child is 4 years regardless. so maybe the for the first comments do your research before you comment this is 24 7 for years to come
I claimed before my sons second op and was awarded so that has nothing to do with the outcome. As well as all the above comments bedding and clothes that are stained need replacing, electric because you have washing machine on day and night to try and keep everything stain free. It use to take me most of the night to clean explosive stool shower or bath my son and after more pain relief settle him as he was in pain worse then colic,teething then you would have to deal with that on top. nhs won't provide nappies until your child is 4 years regardless. so maybe the for the first comments do your research before you comment this is 24 7 for years to come Summer83
  • Score: -1

6:47am Fri 31 Aug 12

xjohnx says...

Max's mum wrote:
I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story.
My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting.
He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night.
How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool.
He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this.
Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby.
I understand your story.

I also understand the benefit system.

The lady should contact the CAB as I advised, at present she is making claims the benefit system ( all of us ) will not consider.
[quote][p][bold]Max's mum[/bold] wrote: I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story. My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting. He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night. How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool. He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this. Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby.[/p][/quote]I understand your story. I also understand the benefit system. The lady should contact the CAB as I advised, at present she is making claims the benefit system ( all of us ) will not consider. xjohnx
  • Score: -4

9:23am Fri 31 Aug 12

Max's mum says...

xjohnx wrote:
Max's mum wrote:
I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story.
My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting.
He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night.
How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool.
He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this.
Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby.
I understand your story.

I also understand the benefit system.

The lady should contact the CAB as I advised, at present she is making claims the benefit system ( all of us ) will not consider.
Did you not read the above comments??
[quote][p][bold]xjohnx[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Max's mum[/bold] wrote: I think the first person who commented on this didn't really understand the story. My son has no large intestine and 20cm missing from his small intestine. Obviously that doesn't mean that he is fine until he has his operation to reverse his stoma in a couple of months time, as you are suggesting. He currently has a colostomy bag which needs regular changing and cleaning to keep it from getting sore or infected. He constantly has stool coming from it, day and night. How many babies do you know that poo out of their tummies?? My maternity leave has now ended and if I went back to work, who would change his bag for him? At present, only me and my partner do it, we had to be trained how to do it, and believe me, its not easy. When it leaks it messes all his clothes and bedding, and makes his skin extremely sore. So sore that it bleeds. He had his last operation 4 months ago and his skin still hasn't healed properly due to it being constantly covered in stool. He also gets dehydrated as fluid passes through him a lot quicker than other children. We have to give him sodium supplements for this. Yeah I guess he's just like any other baby.[/p][/quote]I understand your story. I also understand the benefit system. The lady should contact the CAB as I advised, at present she is making claims the benefit system ( all of us ) will not consider.[/p][/quote]Did you not read the above comments?? Max's mum
  • Score: -2

9:37pm Fri 31 Aug 12

Buffetcrasher says...

I understand the upset of parents who have a child with this condition as I have a child with long-term illness, but I truly believe the comments were made in the spirit of helpfulness. K owing how the benefit system works you have the play the system.
I understand the upset of parents who have a child with this condition as I have a child with long-term illness, but I truly believe the comments were made in the spirit of helpfulness. K owing how the benefit system works you have the play the system. Buffetcrasher
  • Score: 1

9:56pm Fri 31 Aug 12

Buffetcrasher says...

I have a child who only qualified for DLA when he was past the "normal" nappy age and couldn't walk far enough to enable me to take his brother to playgroup. I would imagine that's what people mean when they say that "powers that be" etc. need no more than the usual care of babies. I did what Feelingmatter did, and re-applied after being refused with EXACTLY the same information. I got medium support and it was a life-saver. Another thing to be aware of is that continence services (nappies etc.) can be secured though your GP and community nurse, although changes have recently been made. Also bear in mind that giving medications and a special diet can be seen as normal care when you apply for DLA. Joining a carer's support group can help you too.
I have a child who only qualified for DLA when he was past the "normal" nappy age and couldn't walk far enough to enable me to take his brother to playgroup. I would imagine that's what people mean when they say that "powers that be" etc. need no more than the usual care of babies. I did what Feelingmatter did, and re-applied after being refused with EXACTLY the same information. I got medium support and it was a life-saver. Another thing to be aware of is that continence services (nappies etc.) can be secured though your GP and community nurse, although changes have recently been made. Also bear in mind that giving medications and a special diet can be seen as normal care when you apply for DLA. Joining a carer's support group can help you too. Buffetcrasher
  • Score: 0

9:09am Sun 2 Sep 12

Lord Palmerstone says...

"About 1,000 city benefit claimants will get extra support as part of preparations for universal credit reforms.
Oxford City Council will contact residents to help them find work and understand the universal credit changes covering income and housing benefit which are being rolled into a single payment. from next year."
Not "universal" I think: few will fly to Somalia-or indeed Roumania, or Mars-to pick up a welfare cheque. No, it's just sad old, soft old, England.
"About 1,000 city benefit claimants will get extra support as part of preparations for universal credit reforms. Oxford City Council will contact residents to help them find work and understand the universal credit changes covering income and housing benefit which are being rolled into a single payment. from next year." Not "universal" I think: few will fly to Somalia-or indeed Roumania, or Mars-to pick up a welfare cheque. No, it's just sad old, soft old, England. Lord Palmerstone
  • Score: -5

2:57pm Tue 4 Sep 12

fronfoot says...

What a load of crap..
What a load of crap.. fronfoot
  • Score: 3

4:38pm Sat 8 Sep 12

leahp1983 says...

I was born with Hirschsprungs disease 29 years ago and my mum had to really fight the system to get extra help to enable her to care for me, I had a stoma from 17 days old until I was 4 months old and after reversal I was left severely incontinent day and night but the pen pushers told her that she did not qualify for help towards nappies, creams, bedding and washing machines all of which I would wreck.
As soon as I turned 16 they cut it off despite appeals so I have had to work myself into the ground to pay for everything myself and that made me very ill so I chose to have a stoma back 2 years ago as I was still incontinent at 28 years old and enough was enough!
Maybe the people who sit there assesing these forms should actually get off theit butts and spend a day in the life of someone with hirschsprungs and then tell us we're "NORMAL".
I was born with Hirschsprungs disease 29 years ago and my mum had to really fight the system to get extra help to enable her to care for me, I had a stoma from 17 days old until I was 4 months old and after reversal I was left severely incontinent day and night but the pen pushers told her that she did not qualify for help towards nappies, creams, bedding and washing machines all of which I would wreck. As soon as I turned 16 they cut it off despite appeals so I have had to work myself into the ground to pay for everything myself and that made me very ill so I chose to have a stoma back 2 years ago as I was still incontinent at 28 years old and enough was enough! Maybe the people who sit there assesing these forms should actually get off theit butts and spend a day in the life of someone with hirschsprungs and then tell us we're "NORMAL". leahp1983
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