Kerbside flowers help persuade drivers to slow down

thisisoxfordshire: From left, county councillor Roz Smith, Frank McKenna and Phil Gauron with one of the planters installed on the busy crossroads at Lime Walk From left, county councillor Roz Smith, Frank McKenna and Phil Gauron with one of the planters installed on the busy crossroads at Lime Walk

A STREET in Headington has been given a makeover to encourage drivers to keep to a 20mph speed limit.

Members of the Highfield Residents’ Association have set up two large raised flower beds and four square flower beds on Lime Walk.

They hope that the £800 planters will brighten up the road and cause drivers to slow down.

Committee member for Traffic Phil Gauron, said: “It is a general reminder that the road is a 20mph zone.

“There’s lots of grannies and kids and there’s speeding traffic. People are perfectly entitled to use our street, as long as they are driving at 20mph.

“We would like to see more restrictions on the street to reinforce that this is a residential community and not just any road that people drive through.”

The association applied for funding from county councillor Roz Smith’s community grant to pay for the raised beds.

The planters have been made and designed by the Pathway Workshop, which is a charity based in Blackbird Leys that makes raised beds and garden furniture. The charity works with disadvantaged adults aged between 16 and 80, with both physical disabilities and learning impairments.

Mr Gauron, a Lime Walk resident, said: “We had known about the Pathway Workshop for a long time and we wanted to support a positive venture, rather than just buy them from a company. The point is to raise awareness and hopefully drivers will drive more slowly through that junction.”

Youngsters have also designed special banners for the beds and there are also flags and plants. Organisers hope to plant more plants later this year.

Smaller pot plants lasted six to eight months on Lime Walk, but the organisers hope that these raised beds will last for years to come.

Frank McKenna worked with Mr Gauron to plan for the raised beds and the Lime Walk residents are pleased with the results.

Mr McKenna said: “The community has been working with Oxfordshire County Council to have traffic calming measures in the area for a number of years. It has proved popular with pedestrians and cyclists and not so popular with motorists, which suggests it has been successful.

“I think for something that has been done with a limited budget, they look quite acceptable.”

Community groups battled for 15 years to reduce the speed limit on the road and hope these new raised beds will encourage drivers to keep to the speed limit.

Oxfordshire county councillor for Headington and Quarry Mrs Smith said: “They applied for one of the councillors’ community grants. Originally they had come together to put pot plants out to show where the new chicane was. It was to make the road much more pedestrian friendly and to make cars and traffic aware that there was a heavily used pedestrian crossing point. The council decided that they weren’t really suitable.

“I’m always looking for other community ideas that people want to apply for. I think it was a street-friendly idea.”

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Comments (8)

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10:49pm Tue 17 Jun 14

HomerSimpsonDoh says...

If you want it to be your street, then pay for it, otherwise I'll drive down there whenever I want.
If you want it to be your street, then pay for it, otherwise I'll drive down there whenever I want. HomerSimpsonDoh
  • Score: 2

1:38am Wed 18 Jun 14

Neonlights says...

"People are perfectly entitled to use our street, as long as they are driving at 20mph"

You heard it from the horses mouth folks. He wants you to drive at 20mph along his street. Not up to 20mph, but actually 20mph.
"People are perfectly entitled to use our street, as long as they are driving at 20mph" You heard it from the horses mouth folks. He wants you to drive at 20mph along his street. Not up to 20mph, but actually 20mph. Neonlights
  • Score: 1

9:11am Wed 18 Jun 14

jamiek says...

Didnt they need planning permission for these raised flower beds or can anyone put these out despite them maybe blocking the footpath !
Didnt they need planning permission for these raised flower beds or can anyone put these out despite them maybe blocking the footpath ! jamiek
  • Score: 2

12:05pm Wed 18 Jun 14

yabbadabbadoo256 says...

I may have to go down there. trip over them and sue the residents
I may have to go down there. trip over them and sue the residents yabbadabbadoo256
  • Score: 0

12:39pm Wed 18 Jun 14

tinsel84 says...

“We would like to see more restrictions on the street to reinforce that this is a residential community and not just any road that people drive through.”

It's a public road, so it is "just any road that people drive through".

You could make the flowers even more effective by tying them to a lamp post and embedding a car into a tree.
“We would like to see more restrictions on the street to reinforce that this is a residential community and not just any road that people drive through.” It's a public road, so it is "just any road that people drive through". You could make the flowers even more effective by tying them to a lamp post and embedding a car into a tree. tinsel84
  • Score: 1

1:11pm Wed 18 Jun 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

tinsel84 wrote:
“We would like to see more restrictions on the street to reinforce that this is a residential community and not just any road that people drive through.”

It's a public road, so it is "just any road that people drive through".

You could make the flowers even more effective by tying them to a lamp post and embedding a car into a tree.
The best way to help the residents of Lime Walk (as well as Latimer Road, New High Street & Kennett Road) would be to close the junction with London Road to through traffic (except cycles, horses and pedestrians) and force, what would residential traffic only, to enter via Old Road.

This would allow a clear pedestrian boulevard all the way from Windmill Road to Brookside.
[quote][p][bold]tinsel84[/bold] wrote: “We would like to see more restrictions on the street to reinforce that this is a residential community and not just any road that people drive through.” It's a public road, so it is "just any road that people drive through". You could make the flowers even more effective by tying them to a lamp post and embedding a car into a tree.[/p][/quote]The best way to help the residents of Lime Walk (as well as Latimer Road, New High Street & Kennett Road) would be to close the junction with London Road to through traffic (except cycles, horses and pedestrians) and force, what would residential traffic only, to enter via Old Road. This would allow a clear pedestrian boulevard all the way from Windmill Road to Brookside. Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 1

1:23pm Wed 18 Jun 14

Neonlights says...

"The best way to help the residents would be to close the junction with London Road to through traffic, except cycles"

The cycles would ride through there faster than 20mph and also be allowed to get away with it because as we know from previous reports on here - speed limits don't apply to cyclists.
"The best way to help the residents would be to close the junction with London Road to through traffic, except cycles" The cycles would ride through there faster than 20mph and also be allowed to get away with it because as we know from previous reports on here - speed limits don't apply to cyclists. Neonlights
  • Score: 2

9:03pm Wed 18 Jun 14

Christine Hovis says...

What lovely comments gents.

The problem in these roads is two fold: at rush hours, there is a procession of traffic, weaving along, often going a bit too fast. This junction has been designed to try and slow the traffic down a bit, and that's handy as a proportion of the procession goes off down All Saints Road to try and get through. Let's call that 'rat running'. It's legal, and it would be nice if the volume of traffic was much lower so that people didn't feel the need to do it, but that's ok.

Then, say in the evenings, there are those who still drive through these streets, even though the wider roads with pedestrian crossings etc are clear. Some of those people take the opoprtunity to nip along. At these times it is quite common to find people going well over 30. The County has the data; TVP could issue a lot of fixed penalties if they hung around in the evenings. These people really need to slow down.

So, if a few flower beds help to remind people that this isn't the A40, but a road that was laid out for people to live on before anyone had cars, then that's good.
What lovely comments gents. The problem in these roads is two fold: at rush hours, there is a procession of traffic, weaving along, often going a bit too fast. This junction has been designed to try and slow the traffic down a bit, and that's handy as a proportion of the procession goes off down All Saints Road to try and get through. Let's call that 'rat running'. It's legal, and it would be nice if the volume of traffic was much lower so that people didn't feel the need to do it, but that's ok. Then, say in the evenings, there are those who still drive through these streets, even though the wider roads with pedestrian crossings etc are clear. Some of those people take the opoprtunity to nip along. At these times it is quite common to find people going well over 30. The County has the data; TVP could issue a lot of fixed penalties if they hung around in the evenings. These people really need to slow down. So, if a few flower beds help to remind people that this isn't the A40, but a road that was laid out for people to live on before anyone had cars, then that's good. Christine Hovis
  • Score: 0

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