Street food traders rubbish plans to outlaw polystyrene boxes in Oxford

thisisoxfordshire: Street trader Saeid Keshmiri pictured in 2009 with his kebab van outside Christ Church Street trader Saeid Keshmiri pictured in 2009 with his kebab van outside Christ Church

THE cost of a kebab in Oxford could go up as traders face a new ban on plastic packaging.

Oxford City Council’s general licensing committee wants to force street food traders to use biodegradable or recyclable boxes and utensils, instead of those made of polystyrene.

Committee member Colin Cook said the ban would only apply to traders given regular licences by the city council and that they could use existing polystyrene stocks up first.

He said: “We are trying to target the kebab vans around the city, to reduce the amount of litter that is not biodegradable. The change would be good for the environment and make the waste easier for us to dispose of.

“They may have to pass extra costs on to consumers, but I do not think it will be significant overall.”

If approved, it is thought the ban could be a first for a UK city.

But former kebab seller Saeid Keshmiri, who ran a van outside Christ Church, in St Aldate’s, for 10 years, said the move would prove expensive for traders.

He said: “The council should consider offering subsidies for this scheme, or sell the packaging and utensils to traders itself for a reduced fee.

“It is great for the environment and for future generations, but business is already very hard at the moment because of the economy.”

Rasim Ulas, owner of city centre kebab van Posh Nosh, added: “All takeaway vans use these types of boxes, because they are easier for customers to walk and eat with.

“My business is just a small one and this could be expensive for me.”

Zoe Brown, of Zoe’s Food Service based in Osney Mead, said she already uses mainly biodegradable containers, but that they were often twice the price.

She said: “It will affect a lot of people. I suppose it is good for the planet but it is a pain, especially if you cannot source it.”

Cleaning the streets in the centre costs about £1m each year, with 600 tonnes of litter being collected, the council has said.

The ban is one of a number of measures the council agreed to consult the public on at a meeting on Tuesday night.

As revealed in yesterday’s Oxford Mail, the policy would also see traders banned from operating within 100 metres of any school or college between 7.30am and 6pm.

Rule changes

  • As of February 2012, all streets in Oxford have been designated “consent streets”.
  • That means food traders must apply for a licence from the city council to sell their products.
  • The council’s general licensing committee suggests a condition should be added to licences which forces street traders to only serve their food in packaging that is biodegradable or recyclable.
  • It would ban materials such as polystyrene, which is not biodegradable and can take hundreds of years to break down.
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Comments (4)

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9:09am Thu 12 Jun 14

EMBOX2 says...

Surely it doesn't matter what packaging its in?

Most of it ends up on the pavement, either directly or via the purchaser's stomach, and so if I were a kebab vendor, I would just use the cheapest packaging I could find.....
Surely it doesn't matter what packaging its in? Most of it ends up on the pavement, either directly or via the purchaser's stomach, and so if I were a kebab vendor, I would just use the cheapest packaging I could find..... EMBOX2
  • Score: -5

9:46am Thu 12 Jun 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

I remember whilst living in Germany, certain places sold you chips in edible trays, they looked like polystyrene, but were made of potato starch I think......
I remember whilst living in Germany, certain places sold you chips in edible trays, they looked like polystyrene, but were made of potato starch I think...... Dilligaf2010
  • Score: 5

10:20am Thu 12 Jun 14

GPOWELL says...

I am a food trader and I know the prices of recyclable/compostab
le trays and cutlery. We use cardboard trays and cutlery made from corn starch. Even if the cost was passed on to the customer we are talking no more than 10p extra per serving. In my opinion as a consumer of takeaway food and a supplier that's a price worth paying.
I am a food trader and I know the prices of recyclable/compostab le trays and cutlery. We use cardboard trays and cutlery made from corn starch. Even if the cost was passed on to the customer we are talking no more than 10p extra per serving. In my opinion as a consumer of takeaway food and a supplier that's a price worth paying. GPOWELL
  • Score: 16

12:51pm Thu 12 Jun 14

King Joke says...

There you have it - a sensible measure which won't cost everyone very much, and that last fact straight from the horse's mouth.

I bet there will still be loads of complaints.

Embox, I think the point is that the food is biodegradable, whether it's been eaten first or not but that the packaging is not.
There you have it - a sensible measure which won't cost everyone very much, and that last fact straight from the horse's mouth. I bet there will still be loads of complaints. Embox, I think the point is that the food is biodegradable, whether it's been eaten first or not [!] but that the packaging is not. King Joke
  • Score: 3

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