‘Bus ban’ wheelchair user continues fight

Robert Light with a  copy of some of his court correspondence

Robert Light with a copy of some of his court correspondence

First published in News thisisoxfordshire: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter covering Abingdon and Wantage, South Oxford and Kennington. Call me on 01865 425431

A WHEELCHAIR user who tried to sue Stagecoach Oxford for discriminating against him is appealing against a judge who threw his case out.

Robert Light, 71, was told his lawsuit was thrown out because the judge didn’t receive a written statement in the post.

But he says he has a receipt of delivery signed by the court.

In January last year, Mr Light, whose ankle was removed because of severe arthritis, tried to catch a number 10 bus from Horspath to Cowley centre.

The driver told him he could not get on board because there were already two pushchairs and a shopping trolley on board.

He complained to Stagecoach the next day, and received a letter of apology two weeks later, saying the driver had been reprimanded.

But he says a slap on the wrist was not good enough.

Mr Light, a retired referee and hospital porter, said: “I have come up against so much discrimination it doesn’t surprise me any more, but it still upsets me.

“They shouldn’t be discriminating against people in wheelchairs, but the only people who can do something about it are the courts – I’m nobody.

“Unless they get a bash on the head they probably won’t do anything about it, just brush it under the carpet.”

He started proceedings against the bus company last year, and the case was heard at Oxfordshire County Court on February 13 this year.

Meanwhile, Mr Light, who lives in Yarnton, said he was subject to discrimination by the company’s drivers three more times.

He submitted his evidence to the judge, written out for the case, but the judge said he could not read Mr Light’s handwriting.

He told Mr Light to send him typed notes by March 7, so he posted them, but heard nothing.

When he phoned the court some weeks later he found out the case had been heard in his absence and thrown out.

He contacted the post office, who gave him a receipt which appears to be signed by someone at the court.

Mr Light said: “I just think it’s disgusting.

“I agree with the judge, if he doesn’t get what he asked for, he should throw it out, but he did get it, or at least the court did.”

Oxfordshire County Court Service refused to say whether a member of staff had signed for the parcel.

A court spokesman said: “If Mr Light has asked for leave to appeal, then the papers will be put before a designated civil judge for consideration. If he gets leave he will have a hearing.”

A Stagecoach spokesman said: “We welcome passengers with wheelchairs on board our services.

“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.

“Our drivers are also fully aware of the regulations around this and are expected to ensure that they are adhered to.”

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Comments (43)

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10:16am Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

It sounds like there wasn't any space in the bus for another wheeled vehicle. I can't see what possible case for discrimination there is here.
It sounds like there wasn't any space in the bus for another wheeled vehicle. I can't see what possible case for discrimination there is here. xenarthra
  • Score: -13

10:26am Thu 5 Jun 14

HomerSimpsonDoh says...

did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh HomerSimpsonDoh
  • Score: 19

10:41am Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
Did you not read my comment? I said I can't see what the legal case is for discrimination. What the bus company's signs say is irrelevant: they are not the Equality Act. Google the legal case against Arriva North East in which it was decided that Arriva did not breach the Equality Act by refusing to allow two wheelchair-users onto their buses in Darlington.
[quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]Did you not read my comment? I said I can't see what the legal case is for discrimination. What the bus company's signs say is irrelevant: they are not the Equality Act. Google the legal case against Arriva North East in which it was decided that Arriva did not breach the Equality Act by refusing to allow two wheelchair-users onto their buses in Darlington. xenarthra
  • Score: -16

12:14pm Thu 5 Jun 14

HomerSimpsonDoh says...

It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping. HomerSimpsonDoh
  • Score: 24

12:19pm Thu 5 Jun 14

djlamb69 says...

Ahh, It seems it's ok to discriminate against parents with buggies, who need to go about their daily business ?
Ahh, It seems it's ok to discriminate against parents with buggies, who need to go about their daily business ? djlamb69
  • Score: -24

12:29pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
[quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user. xenarthra
  • Score: -23

12:30pm Thu 5 Jun 14

HomerSimpsonDoh says...

They can walk, disabled person do not always have that option.
They can walk, disabled person do not always have that option. HomerSimpsonDoh
  • Score: 20

12:40pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
They can walk, disabled person do not always have that option.
What planet did you grow up on?! No, babies cannot walk.
[quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: They can walk, disabled person do not always have that option.[/p][/quote]What planet did you grow up on?! No, babies cannot walk. xenarthra
  • Score: -24

1:03pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

djlamb69 wrote:
Ahh, It seems it's ok to discriminate against parents with buggies, who need to go about their daily business ?
Unless they have a disability then yes, they should be made to get off and wait for the next bus. But in respect to the signs, they are useless because in my experience of the No 10 bus, the single mothers with their offspring on there seem incapable of communicating in anything other than 4 letter words and TXT SPK, let alone being able to read
[quote][p][bold]djlamb69[/bold] wrote: Ahh, It seems it's ok to discriminate against parents with buggies, who need to go about their daily business ?[/p][/quote]Unless they have a disability then yes, they should be made to get off and wait for the next bus. But in respect to the signs, they are useless because in my experience of the No 10 bus, the single mothers with their offspring on there seem incapable of communicating in anything other than 4 letter words and TXT SPK, let alone being able to read The New Private Eye
  • Score: 34

1:08pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

xenarthra wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.
[quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human. The New Private Eye
  • Score: 26

1:14pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
xenarthra wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.
My dad has been in a wheelchair all my life. I spent much of my childhood pushing him around towns, before he could afford an electrical wheelchair. He wouldn't dream of turfing old ladies with shopping trolleys or mothers with babies off a full bus because he would rather make them wait for the next one.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.[/p][/quote]My dad has been in a wheelchair all my life. I spent much of my childhood pushing him around towns, before he could afford an electrical wheelchair. He wouldn't dream of turfing old ladies with shopping trolleys or mothers with babies off a full bus because he would rather make them wait for the next one. xenarthra
  • Score: -14

1:15pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
[quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though. Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 12

1:18pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
[quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple The New Private Eye
  • Score: 21

1:19pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
xenarthra wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.
If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.[/p][/quote]If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing. xenarthra
  • Score: -20

1:21pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
What a caring person you are. I hope you never have a baby to look after.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are. I hope you never have a baby to look after. xenarthra
  • Score: -25

1:22pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

xenarthra wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
xenarthra wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.
If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing.
It is a shame that you did not read my post. But I will put it in simple english for you. Baybeees tend to be perfectly healthy and do not mind waiting in their likkle comfortable buggies for the next bus. Handicapped people tend to be in pain, discomfort, and suffering from various medical conditions, and cannot wait for the next bus. Is that simple enough for you.
[quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.[/p][/quote]If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing.[/p][/quote]It is a shame that you did not read my post. But I will put it in simple english for you. Baybeees tend to be perfectly healthy and do not mind waiting in their likkle comfortable buggies for the next bus. Handicapped people tend to be in pain, discomfort, and suffering from various medical conditions, and cannot wait for the next bus. Is that simple enough for you. The New Private Eye
  • Score: 27

1:27pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
xenarthra wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
xenarthra wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.
Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.
What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.
If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing.
It is a shame that you did not read my post. But I will put it in simple english for you. Baybeees tend to be perfectly healthy and do not mind waiting in their likkle comfortable buggies for the next bus. Handicapped people tend to be in pain, discomfort, and suffering from various medical conditions, and cannot wait for the next bus. Is that simple enough for you.
It's simple but unfortunately not very accurate. Your experience of both babies and disabled people seems to be rather limited. Babies get hungry, are incontinent and have a tendency to cry a lot. Wheelchair users can suffer a wide range of afflictions, many of which do not cause constant pain or discomfort.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: It is their bus and as long as it's within the law they can dictate who goes where on the bus. These spaces are for the disabled, not for mums to park their buggies full of shopping.[/p][/quote]Last time I checked, most babies have less ability to walk even short distances than the average wheelchair user.[/p][/quote]What a caring person you are, I hope that one day you are confined to a wheelchair, in constant pain, and suffering from incontinence. We will then see if you would be happy to wait and wait for a bus that refuses you entry because it is full of perfectly healthy single mothers that are too lazy to walk the 20 minutes to Cowley Centre. It is because of people with your attitude that we had to campaign for laws to protect us from discrimination from people that see us as sub-human.[/p][/quote]If you expect a baby to have someone else push it to the Cowley Centre, you should equally well expect a wheelchair user to do the same. If you're seriously trying to argue that a baby is more able-bodied than the average wheelchair user, you're on a hiding to nothing.[/p][/quote]It is a shame that you did not read my post. But I will put it in simple english for you. Baybeees tend to be perfectly healthy and do not mind waiting in their likkle comfortable buggies for the next bus. Handicapped people tend to be in pain, discomfort, and suffering from various medical conditions, and cannot wait for the next bus. Is that simple enough for you.[/p][/quote]It's simple but unfortunately not very accurate. Your experience of both babies and disabled people seems to be rather limited. Babies get hungry, are incontinent and have a tendency to cry a lot. Wheelchair users can suffer a wide range of afflictions, many of which do not cause constant pain or discomfort. xenarthra
  • Score: -19

1:28pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Eraser says...

Another example of the litigious society we live in. Perhaps I'll sue next time a bus comes along that's full and I can't get on. I sympathise with Mr Light but running off to court every time life throws you a curved ball just seems to be the norm for minorities now. We all have bad days - just exercise some common sense and stop thinking the world is against you.
Another example of the litigious society we live in. Perhaps I'll sue next time a bus comes along that's full and I can't get on. I sympathise with Mr Light but running off to court every time life throws you a curved ball just seems to be the norm for minorities now. We all have bad days - just exercise some common sense and stop thinking the world is against you. Eraser
  • Score: -10

1:29pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking... Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: -12

1:33pm Thu 5 Jun 14

xenarthra says...

Andrew:Oxford wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
You may have overlooked the fact that maternity is also a protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010, alongside disability.
[quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...[/p][/quote]You may have overlooked the fact that maternity is also a protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010, alongside disability. xenarthra
  • Score: -11

1:35pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

xenarthra wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
You may have overlooked the fact that maternity is also a protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010, alongside disability.
Perhaps this is why the legislation says "ask" rather than "demand".
[quote][p][bold]xenarthra[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...[/p][/quote]You may have overlooked the fact that maternity is also a protected characteristic under the Equality Act 2010, alongside disability.[/p][/quote]Perhaps this is why the legislation says "ask" rather than "demand". Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: -10

1:37pm Thu 5 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

Andrew:Oxford wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person.
[quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...[/p][/quote]Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person. The New Private Eye
  • Score: 25

7:15pm Thu 5 Jun 14

John Lamb says...

If the sign spells it out clearly, why don't mums appreciate that they are there only until a wheelchair arrives?
Seems pretty simple to understand or am I missing something?
Also, I would very much like to throttle the bus driver who as I was crossing from Tesco on St Aldates to the courts (at 10am), decided to lunge forward as soon as the light turned green, despite me and a young lady being in mid-crossing.
You can only mov forward when the road is clear of pedestrians, numpty.
If the sign spells it out clearly, why don't mums appreciate that they are there only until a wheelchair arrives? Seems pretty simple to understand or am I missing something? Also, I would very much like to throttle the bus driver who as I was crossing from Tesco on St Aldates to the courts (at 10am), decided to lunge forward as soon as the light turned green, despite me and a young lady being in mid-crossing. You can only mov forward when the road is clear of pedestrians, numpty. John Lamb
  • Score: 9

7:15pm Thu 5 Jun 14

piper2011 says...

heavens above, we all need to travel and we all wanted everyone to be treated equally , so WE all need to put up with a bit of inconvience and help each other. this is what happens when people have a great sense of entitlment.
heavens above, we all need to travel and we all wanted everyone to be treated equally , so WE all need to put up with a bit of inconvience and help each other. this is what happens when people have a great sense of entitlment. piper2011
  • Score: -3

7:22pm Thu 5 Jun 14

deedee444 says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person.
why should they in this case???.........mr compo could quite easily have waited for another bus............just gives disabled/old people a bad name.....fair play to the judge for throwing out the case and I hope mr compo has to pay costs himself...no doubt out of his diss benefit.............
.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...[/p][/quote]Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person.[/p][/quote]why should they in this case???.........mr compo could quite easily have waited for another bus............just gives disabled/old people a bad name.....fair play to the judge for throwing out the case and I hope mr compo has to pay costs himself...no doubt out of his diss benefit............. . deedee444
  • Score: -9

11:30pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Anne12345 says...

Im registered disabled and i have a very small child that needs a pushchair. I think the signs should be changed to allow either on a first come first serve basis. All of you that are slatting mums with pushchairs are making out that we are all young
Mums on benefits. I am not a young
Mum nor am i on benefits. I dont see why you should slate
People with pushchairs and call them
Lazy and say they should get off and walk. If the person in the wheelchair is able to get to a bus stop then they are able to use a path like anyone else. If the disabled person is that bad that they cant do anything for them selfs then they would have a carer with them that can push them on the path or wait for the next bus. Also people that are badly disabled as he seem to be saying would be able to swop some of there benefits for a car which can be driven by a third party for them. There are
Also mini buses that pick up and drop off disabled people to places they need to go. I cant walk far and i am i constant pain with a very bad neurological illness I do have a car but sometimes cant drive so need to use the bus with a child in a pushchair. I would not expect a mother and child or another disabled person to get off the bus for me as i feel they have just as much right as me. Maybe the bus companies should
Make more buses with lift up seats so they can cater for more
Mums with pushchairs and disabled people. The issue here is that the buses in certain areas do not meet the needs of that area. But from what i see going past my house everyday are plenty of busses so you wouldn't have to wait long for another bus. Maybe in the future the bus drivers should radio the next bus along to advise a disabled passenger is waiting so they can find out how long they have to wait.
Im registered disabled and i have a very small child that needs a pushchair. I think the signs should be changed to allow either on a first come first serve basis. All of you that are slatting mums with pushchairs are making out that we are all young Mums on benefits. I am not a young Mum nor am i on benefits. I dont see why you should slate People with pushchairs and call them Lazy and say they should get off and walk. If the person in the wheelchair is able to get to a bus stop then they are able to use a path like anyone else. If the disabled person is that bad that they cant do anything for them selfs then they would have a carer with them that can push them on the path or wait for the next bus. Also people that are badly disabled as he seem to be saying would be able to swop some of there benefits for a car which can be driven by a third party for them. There are Also mini buses that pick up and drop off disabled people to places they need to go. I cant walk far and i am i constant pain with a very bad neurological illness I do have a car but sometimes cant drive so need to use the bus with a child in a pushchair. I would not expect a mother and child or another disabled person to get off the bus for me as i feel they have just as much right as me. Maybe the bus companies should Make more buses with lift up seats so they can cater for more Mums with pushchairs and disabled people. The issue here is that the buses in certain areas do not meet the needs of that area. But from what i see going past my house everyday are plenty of busses so you wouldn't have to wait long for another bus. Maybe in the future the bus drivers should radio the next bus along to advise a disabled passenger is waiting so they can find out how long they have to wait. Anne12345
  • Score: -3

11:48pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Anne12345 says...

Anne12345 wrote:
Im registered disabled and i have a very small child that needs a pushchair. I think the signs should be changed to allow either on a first come first serve basis. All of you that are slatting mums with pushchairs are making out that we are all young
Mums on benefits. I am not a young
Mum nor am i on benefits. I dont see why you should slate
People with pushchairs and call them
Lazy and say they should get off and walk. If the person in the wheelchair is able to get to a bus stop then they are able to use a path like anyone else. If the disabled person is that bad that they cant do anything for them selfs then they would have a carer with them that can push them on the path or wait for the next bus. Also people that are badly disabled as he seem to be saying would be able to swop some of there benefits for a car which can be driven by a third party for them. There are
Also mini buses that pick up and drop off disabled people to places they need to go. I cant walk far and i am i constant pain with a very bad neurological illness I do have a car but sometimes cant drive so need to use the bus with a child in a pushchair. I would not expect a mother and child or another disabled person to get off the bus for me as i feel they have just as much right as me. Maybe the bus companies should
Make more buses with lift up seats so they can cater for more
Mums with pushchairs and disabled people. The issue here is that the buses in certain areas do not meet the needs of that area. But from what i see going past my house everyday are plenty of busses so you wouldn't have to wait long for another bus. Maybe in the future the bus drivers should radio the next bus along to advise a disabled passenger is waiting so they can find out how long they have to wait.
And for any smart arses out there that will say if you can walk and dont use a wheelchair how can you be disabled. Then you need to look the word up in length.
[quote][p][bold]Anne12345[/bold] wrote: Im registered disabled and i have a very small child that needs a pushchair. I think the signs should be changed to allow either on a first come first serve basis. All of you that are slatting mums with pushchairs are making out that we are all young Mums on benefits. I am not a young Mum nor am i on benefits. I dont see why you should slate People with pushchairs and call them Lazy and say they should get off and walk. If the person in the wheelchair is able to get to a bus stop then they are able to use a path like anyone else. If the disabled person is that bad that they cant do anything for them selfs then they would have a carer with them that can push them on the path or wait for the next bus. Also people that are badly disabled as he seem to be saying would be able to swop some of there benefits for a car which can be driven by a third party for them. There are Also mini buses that pick up and drop off disabled people to places they need to go. I cant walk far and i am i constant pain with a very bad neurological illness I do have a car but sometimes cant drive so need to use the bus with a child in a pushchair. I would not expect a mother and child or another disabled person to get off the bus for me as i feel they have just as much right as me. Maybe the bus companies should Make more buses with lift up seats so they can cater for more Mums with pushchairs and disabled people. The issue here is that the buses in certain areas do not meet the needs of that area. But from what i see going past my house everyday are plenty of busses so you wouldn't have to wait long for another bus. Maybe in the future the bus drivers should radio the next bus along to advise a disabled passenger is waiting so they can find out how long they have to wait.[/p][/quote]And for any smart arses out there that will say if you can walk and dont use a wheelchair how can you be disabled. Then you need to look the word up in length. Anne12345
  • Score: -2

10:43am Fri 6 Jun 14

djlamb69 says...

@ Anne12345
Brilliant comment, at least we got one sensible person on here.
@ Anne12345 Brilliant comment, at least we got one sensible person on here. djlamb69
  • Score: -1

12:07pm Fri 6 Jun 14

Niko Bellic says...

To make things equal, someone has to be disadvantaged. Incontinence is not an affliction suffered solely by the wheelchair bound, and neither can you trust a baby to walk into town. Seriously, whoever suggested that be the case has a disability of the thought process
To make things equal, someone has to be disadvantaged. Incontinence is not an affliction suffered solely by the wheelchair bound, and neither can you trust a baby to walk into town. Seriously, whoever suggested that be the case has a disability of the thought process Niko Bellic
  • Score: -8

3:04pm Fri 6 Jun 14

gas465 says...

Nobody asks the mother and baby to get off the bus. They always have the option to fold the buggy and store it in the luggage area. They can then carry the baby for the duration of the journey. Sure it takes time but its an option. A wheelchair user simply doesnt have that option.
Nobody asks the mother and baby to get off the bus. They always have the option to fold the buggy and store it in the luggage area. They can then carry the baby for the duration of the journey. Sure it takes time but its an option. A wheelchair user simply doesnt have that option. gas465
  • Score: 17

4:13pm Fri 6 Jun 14

John Lamb says...

I think the mums just chose to ignore that option gas465.
This is exactly what happens on the buses; wheelchair user wants to use the space, mums protest and an embarassing squabble starts.
I remember a time not so long ago when ALL buggies and pushchairs had to be folded up before being allowed on the bus.
Some folk just don't realise when they've got it good.
The only person who DIDN'T get to use the bus was the poor guy in the wheelchair; lets not forget this eh? Folding a pushchair may be inconvenient but spending a few days in a wheelchair may alter this perspective.
Those calling him a 'compo' claimer are just the lowest common denominator letting forth their version of an opinion.
Without guys like this the disabled would still have to be carried into places instead of amps being built. Things have improved, but, as evident by some of the comments on here; the disabled still have a long way to go before being treated as equals.
I think the mums just chose to ignore that option gas465. This is exactly what happens on the buses; wheelchair user wants to use the space, mums protest and an embarassing squabble starts. I remember a time not so long ago when ALL buggies and pushchairs had to be folded up before being allowed on the bus. Some folk just don't realise when they've got it good. The only person who DIDN'T get to use the bus was the poor guy in the wheelchair; lets not forget this eh? Folding a pushchair may be inconvenient but spending a few days in a wheelchair may alter this perspective. Those calling him a 'compo' claimer are just the lowest common denominator letting forth their version of an opinion. Without guys like this the disabled would still have to be carried into places instead of amps being built. Things have improved, but, as evident by some of the comments on here; the disabled still have a long way to go before being treated as equals. John Lamb
  • Score: 14

5:30pm Fri 6 Jun 14

MrsRabbit says...

Can I just ask how a Mum is meant to fold up her pushchair/pram with a new born or tiny baby? By the way I'm not a young single mum, I just don't own a car as the public transport is very good in Oxford. I will always move for a disabled person, but I think I may be disgruntled at being thrown off a bus when actually the person with the disability could wait for the next one? I would like to say my objection to pushchairs is that a large amount of the time they are used by children who are old enough to walk, that is where the problem lies in my opinion. It also is worth as previously said taking into consideration that not all.disabled people look like they have a disability.
Can I just ask how a Mum is meant to fold up her pushchair/pram with a new born or tiny baby? By the way I'm not a young single mum, I just don't own a car as the public transport is very good in Oxford. I will always move for a disabled person, but I think I may be disgruntled at being thrown off a bus when actually the person with the disability could wait for the next one? I would like to say my objection to pushchairs is that a large amount of the time they are used by children who are old enough to walk, that is where the problem lies in my opinion. It also is worth as previously said taking into consideration that not all.disabled people look like they have a disability. MrsRabbit
  • Score: -9

10:03pm Fri 6 Jun 14

wend says...

I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus.

Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received.
People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can.
I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus. Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received. People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can. wend
  • Score: -7

2:47am Sat 7 Jun 14

The New Private Eye says...

deedee444 wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem.

Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point?

But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...
Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person.
why should they in this case???.........mr compo could quite easily have waited for another bus............just gives disabled/old people a bad name.....fair play to the judge for throwing out the case and I hope mr compo has to pay costs himself...no doubt out of his diss benefit.............

.
You are funny deedee444. People like you always brighten up my day when there is no Jeremy Kyle to watch. If you had bothered to comprehend the report above, that is, if you even read it, then you would realise that the reason for the Judge dismissing the case was not due to the validity of Mr Lights case, but because of a court official/employee failing to deliver Mr Lights statement to the Judge. Now this means that it is not "Mr Compo" as you so kindly describe Mr Light that will pay costs, but it will be the complete opposite and it will be your tax payers money that pays for the next hearing. But what really puzzles me is why any normal human being would want to attack on a local newspapers website a 71 year old disabled man. Can you explain your written assault on Mr Light please?
[quote][p][bold]deedee444[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]And the mother or guardian can say "no". This is the problem. Perhaps the driver should dial "999" at this point? But it's a civil matter as the driver has met the legislative requirement by asking...[/p][/quote]Correct Andrew, much the same as a Landlord can ask me to leave his pub if I do not abide by his rules. And when I refuse he either manhandles me out side or does as you suggest and call 999. For the bus driver I would suggest the latter. But the real problem is the selfish society we live in, where the young do not even offer their seats to the elderly let alone a disabled person.[/p][/quote]why should they in this case???.........mr compo could quite easily have waited for another bus............just gives disabled/old people a bad name.....fair play to the judge for throwing out the case and I hope mr compo has to pay costs himself...no doubt out of his diss benefit............. .[/p][/quote]You are funny deedee444. People like you always brighten up my day when there is no Jeremy Kyle to watch. If you had bothered to comprehend the report above, that is, if you even read it, then you would realise that the reason for the Judge dismissing the case was not due to the validity of Mr Lights case, but because of a court official/employee failing to deliver Mr Lights statement to the Judge. Now this means that it is not "Mr Compo" as you so kindly describe Mr Light that will pay costs, but it will be the complete opposite and it will be your tax payers money that pays for the next hearing. But what really puzzles me is why any normal human being would want to attack on a local newspapers website a 71 year old disabled man. Can you explain your written assault on Mr Light please? The New Private Eye
  • Score: 4

7:57am Sat 7 Jun 14

the wizard says...

wend wrote:
I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus.

Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received.
People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can.
Maybe buses don't have an infinitive number of seats , but able bodied people can stand for part of their journey you know, and if you Wend and Xenarthra did a few more bus journeys and got yourselves into a wheelchair for the day you may see where some people are coming from here. Bus drivers on the whole are fine, but there are a few for whom the slightest amount of effort and something which gets them out of their seat is a request too far. A lot of people have criticized views of others, why ? because they are ill informed. Believe me, sitting in the 72 spoke wire wheeled drop head coupe is at times a difficult quest, made more so by the ignorance of others who think they are above it all. If you are lucky you get into old age, and if you are unlucky that brings with it a wheelchair, what say you after you get one ?
[quote][p][bold]wend[/bold] wrote: I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus. Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received. People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can.[/p][/quote]Maybe buses don't have an infinitive number of seats , but able bodied people can stand for part of their journey you know, and if you Wend and Xenarthra did a few more bus journeys and got yourselves into a wheelchair for the day you may see where some people are coming from here. Bus drivers on the whole are fine, but there are a few for whom the slightest amount of effort and something which gets them out of their seat is a request too far. A lot of people have criticized views of others, why ? because they are ill informed. Believe me, sitting in the 72 spoke wire wheeled drop head coupe is at times a difficult quest, made more so by the ignorance of others who think they are above it all. If you are lucky you get into old age, and if you are unlucky that brings with it a wheelchair, what say you after you get one ? the wizard
  • Score: 6

8:07am Sat 7 Jun 14

the wizard says...

deedee444, Had a good look at yourself in the mirror lately ? a good long hard look ? hope you liked what you saw, Christ you are soooooooo ignorant, you have it in abundance, to the point of abusing it should it have been judged a virtue.
deedee444, Had a good look at yourself in the mirror lately ? a good long hard look ? hope you liked what you saw, Christ you are soooooooo ignorant, you have it in abundance, to the point of abusing it should it have been judged a virtue. the wizard
  • Score: 6

9:59am Sat 7 Jun 14

wend says...

the wizard wrote:
wend wrote:
I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus.

Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received.
People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can.
Maybe buses don't have an infinitive number of seats , but able bodied people can stand for part of their journey you know, and if you Wend and Xenarthra did a few more bus journeys and got yourselves into a wheelchair for the day you may see where some people are coming from here. Bus drivers on the whole are fine, but there are a few for whom the slightest amount of effort and something which gets them out of their seat is a request too far. A lot of people have criticized views of others, why ? because they are ill informed. Believe me, sitting in the 72 spoke wire wheeled drop head coupe is at times a difficult quest, made more so by the ignorance of others who think they are above it all. If you are lucky you get into old age, and if you are unlucky that brings with it a wheelchair, what say you after you get one ?
But the bottom line is that there are only a limited number of spaces available for buggy and wheelchair users and as far as I'm aware it would not be legal for a bus driver to order a fare paying buggy user off the bus to make way for a wheelchair user. It doesn't matter how much you criticise and verbally abuse people it's still a fact. People who disagree with you are not ill informed, they just have a different opinion. It's a fact if life that not everyone will agree with you.
[quote][p][bold]the wizard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wend[/bold] wrote: I'm not sure what law there is that orders a bus company to eject a fare-paying passenger who is not causing trouble on the bus, to make way for a wheelchair user. By all means the driver can ask a passenger with a buggy to get off in order to make way for a wheelchair user but if the passenger does not wish to get off the bus what is the driver supposed to do? The buses don't have an infinite number of seats so like the world over if the bus is full then we have to wait for the next bus. Anne 12345 is absolutely spot on with her comment. Some of the abuse on here is ridiculous and totally unnecessary. Xenarthra's comment is completely reasonable and certainly does not deserve the vicious and spiteful reaction it received. People with a physical disability are by and large just like the rest of us and would not expect other people to be thrown off public transport to accommodate them. In an ideal world there would be far more provision for wheelchair users but until this happens we have to try and be as accommodating as we can.[/p][/quote]Maybe buses don't have an infinitive number of seats , but able bodied people can stand for part of their journey you know, and if you Wend and Xenarthra did a few more bus journeys and got yourselves into a wheelchair for the day you may see where some people are coming from here. Bus drivers on the whole are fine, but there are a few for whom the slightest amount of effort and something which gets them out of their seat is a request too far. A lot of people have criticized views of others, why ? because they are ill informed. Believe me, sitting in the 72 spoke wire wheeled drop head coupe is at times a difficult quest, made more so by the ignorance of others who think they are above it all. If you are lucky you get into old age, and if you are unlucky that brings with it a wheelchair, what say you after you get one ?[/p][/quote]But the bottom line is that there are only a limited number of spaces available for buggy and wheelchair users and as far as I'm aware it would not be legal for a bus driver to order a fare paying buggy user off the bus to make way for a wheelchair user. It doesn't matter how much you criticise and verbally abuse people it's still a fact. People who disagree with you are not ill informed, they just have a different opinion. It's a fact if life that not everyone will agree with you. wend
  • Score: -1

1:38pm Sat 7 Jun 14

OXFORDLASS123 says...

I have never in my life read such utter rubbish regarding this article, and such venomous comments... verging on the down right immature if you ask me,
This gentleman surely can not expect any fair paying (he will use the bus for free no doubt) to remove them selves with children or buggy to make way for him! does he really think this would happen? i would not get off the bus especially if i had paid and i had children with me, he obviously feels far to superior to the *single parents* on the bus, (how does anyone know they are single)....my goodness my elderly mother would NEVER seek such attention,, i expect the bus drivers dread him getting on their bus, i think he needs to get a grip and realise the world does NOT revolve around him or other disabled people, they do get lots of help anyway! outrageous comes to mind.
I have never in my life read such utter rubbish regarding this article, and such venomous comments... verging on the down right immature if you ask me, This gentleman surely can not expect any fair paying (he will use the bus for free no doubt) to remove them selves with children or buggy to make way for him! does he really think this would happen? i would not get off the bus especially if i had paid and i had children with me, he obviously feels far to superior to the *single parents* on the bus, (how does anyone know they are single)....my goodness my elderly mother would NEVER seek such attention,, i expect the bus drivers dread him getting on their bus, i think he needs to get a grip and realise the world does NOT revolve around him or other disabled people, they do get lots of help anyway! outrageous comes to mind. OXFORDLASS123
  • Score: 1

4:25pm Sat 7 Jun 14

wend says...

Fortunately the vast majority of disabled people are nothing like this person; they are prepared to accept that space is limited even though, as we all know, public transport is severely limited in space for them. We can only hope that as newer buses come into use there may be extra provision for both buggy and wheelchair users.
Fortunately the vast majority of disabled people are nothing like this person; they are prepared to accept that space is limited even though, as we all know, public transport is severely limited in space for them. We can only hope that as newer buses come into use there may be extra provision for both buggy and wheelchair users. wend
  • Score: -1

5:24pm Sat 7 Jun 14

cuckoo says...

1: The no. 10 bus doesn't service Horspath....although it does Horspath Road.
2: There was mention of a shopping trolley already on the bus (along with the buggy's).....so why so much criticism of the young mothers with the buggy's? Accept it may have been an elderly person who may have been shopping in Headington or Cowley Centre .....another person with limited mobility maybe?
3: Pretty sure the no. 10 bus runs every 12 minutes or so (depending on traffic during peak times)..............
surely it wouldn't have been very long before the next bus arrived then!
4: Regardless of how 'lazy' some folk (may or may not be) if you pay your bus fare at point A to get to point B then you are a bonafide passenger.
5: I pity the poor bus driver in this instance ie: damned if he/she did, damned if he/she didn't!!!
1: The no. 10 bus doesn't service Horspath....although it does Horspath Road. 2: There was mention of a shopping trolley already on the bus (along with the buggy's).....so why so much criticism of the young mothers with the buggy's? Accept it may have been an elderly person who may have been shopping in Headington or Cowley Centre .....another person with limited mobility maybe? 3: Pretty sure the no. 10 bus runs every 12 minutes or so (depending on traffic during peak times).............. surely it wouldn't have been very long before the next bus arrived then! 4: Regardless of how 'lazy' some folk (may or may not be) if you pay your bus fare at point A to get to point B then you are a bonafide passenger. 5: I pity the poor bus driver in this instance ie: damned if he/she did, damned if he/she didn't!!! cuckoo
  • Score: 2

5:35pm Sat 7 Jun 14

cuckoo says...

wend wrote:
Fortunately the vast majority of disabled people are nothing like this person; they are prepared to accept that space is limited even though, as we all know, public transport is severely limited in space for them. We can only hope that as newer buses come into use there may be extra provision for both buggy and wheelchair users.
Good comment!
[quote][p][bold]wend[/bold] wrote: Fortunately the vast majority of disabled people are nothing like this person; they are prepared to accept that space is limited even though, as we all know, public transport is severely limited in space for them. We can only hope that as newer buses come into use there may be extra provision for both buggy and wheelchair users.[/p][/quote]Good comment! cuckoo
  • Score: -1

11:46am Mon 9 Jun 14

gans shakes says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
Andrew:Oxford wrote:
HomerSimpsonDoh wrote:
did you not read all of the above?????
“There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user.
Doh
However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space.

They can simply say "no".


So the driver essentially faces the choice of:-

Driving off without the wheelchair user

or

Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram.


As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former.

It doesn't make it right though.
No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple
In the front section of all buses there are clear indications that those with disabilities are given priority over trolleys and prams.Please have a look when you take the bus next time. The mother can collapse the pram and hold their child. There is no reason to eject the mother and child out of the designated space. Just permit the mother, with the public offering help with the mother and the child. Problem resolved.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andrew:Oxford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HomerSimpsonDoh[/bold] wrote: did you not read all of the above????? “There is clear signage on our buses to indicate that customers must vacate the wheelchair space immediately, should it be required by a wheelchair user. Doh[/p][/quote]However, there isn't the legislation on place to *force* the existing customers to vacate the space. They can simply say "no". So the driver essentially faces the choice of:- Driving off without the wheelchair user or Physically removing baby from pram, handing baby to nearby customer and collapsing the pram. As the the second would result in a red-faced mother screaming child-assault in the pages of every eager newspaper, I can understand why the driver would choose the former. It doesn't make it right though.[/p][/quote]No the driver simply tell the mother to get off and wait for the next bus because the space she is occupying is a space with priority for a wheelchair user. Simple[/p][/quote]In the front section of all buses there are clear indications that those with disabilities are given priority over trolleys and prams.Please have a look when you take the bus next time. The mother can collapse the pram and hold their child. There is no reason to eject the mother and child out of the designated space. Just permit the mother, with the public offering help with the mother and the child. Problem resolved. gans shakes
  • Score: 2

10:04pm Mon 9 Jun 14

deedee444 says...

I think the bus company should ban the miserable ****.........see how he likes THAT!!!
I think the bus company should ban the miserable ****.........see how he likes THAT!!! deedee444
  • Score: -1

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