Charity warning over fake collection sacks

thisisoxfordshire: The fake logo The fake logo

Fraudsters are targeting the city with fake charity activity to steal clothes and money.

Organisations have been distributing clothing recycling bags with Cystic Fibrosis Trust’s old logo, top, without the charity’s agreement.

thisisoxfordshire:

Genuine collection bags used by the charity carry the logo above.

The charity, which uses a new logo aid it was working with the police to prevent people being scammed.

The trust is asking for people to provide information about the fake sacks by emailing recycling@cysticfibrosis.org.uk

Comments (3)

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10:29am Thu 29 May 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

These bags are an utter farce.

We have green "Activists" hand wringing and blustering angrily daily about grocers giving away bags for consumers to carry their shopping.

At least 4 times a week I come home to one or more very large "charity" bags inside a sturdy plastic pouch through my door - it's the equivalent plastic to around 20 carrier bags through my door every week!

Yet not once do you hear of a green "Activist" protesting about "charity" bags - even though the majority go straight to landfill.

There is a clear market for a kerbside collection of unwanted but serviceable goods or recycleable materials. Perhaps a consortium of charities that are special to Oxford should work together with the local authority for a single monthly collection of such goods - it would probably count towards the city's recyling targets if the city council were involved and boost our recycling figures dramatically...
These bags are an utter farce. We have green "Activists" hand wringing and blustering angrily daily about grocers giving away bags for consumers to carry their shopping. At least 4 times a week I come home to one or more very large "charity" bags inside a sturdy plastic pouch through my door - it's the equivalent plastic to around 20 carrier bags through my door every week! Yet not once do you hear of a green "Activist" protesting about "charity" bags - even though the majority go straight to landfill. There is a clear market for a kerbside collection of unwanted but serviceable goods or recycleable materials. Perhaps a consortium of charities that are special to Oxford should work together with the local authority for a single monthly collection of such goods - it would probably count towards the city's recyling targets if the city council were involved and boost our recycling figures dramatically... Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 3

12:18pm Thu 29 May 14

King Joke says...

THe last idea is a good one Andrew, but your sneering at environmental groups is highly distasteful. Do you enjoy being nasty?

I think you'll find most environmental groups would strongly oppose the waste these useless collections generate (in my experience they never turn up) but it's a difficult media management brief criticising a charity, which I imagine is why they keep quiet.

I always throw the sacks straight in the bin as soon as they arrive - eventually if the charities realise no-one is donating they will stop this method of collection. I put any unwanted but serviceable goods on Gumtree or Freecycle, and clothes in the clothes bank behind the Folly Bridge Inn.
THe last idea is a good one Andrew, but your sneering at environmental groups is highly distasteful. Do you enjoy being nasty? I think you'll find most environmental groups would strongly oppose the waste these useless collections generate (in my experience they never turn up) but it's a difficult media management brief criticising a charity, which I imagine is why they keep quiet. I always throw the sacks straight in the bin as soon as they arrive - eventually if the charities realise no-one is donating they will stop this method of collection. I put any unwanted but serviceable goods on Gumtree or Freecycle, and clothes in the clothes bank behind the Folly Bridge Inn. King Joke
  • Score: 0

1:23pm Thu 29 May 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

King Joke wrote:
THe last idea is a good one Andrew, but your sneering at environmental groups is highly distasteful. Do you enjoy being nasty?

I think you'll find most environmental groups would strongly oppose the waste these useless collections generate (in my experience they never turn up) but it's a difficult media management brief criticising a charity, which I imagine is why they keep quiet.

I always throw the sacks straight in the bin as soon as they arrive - eventually if the charities realise no-one is donating they will stop this method of collection. I put any unwanted but serviceable goods on Gumtree or Freecycle, and clothes in the clothes bank behind the Folly Bridge Inn.
Essentially you agree with me then...

Green activist groups focus on the clean and easy press-release friendly targets - the urban middle-class grocer and retailer.

Steering clear of the complex "untouchable" target of charity or "charity" bags that would potentially result in Facebook, Netmums, Mumsnet or Twitter outrage.

The numbers are quite straightforward...

Around 4 a week for me is 200 bags a year.
Around 55,000 households in Oxford is 11,000,000 bags a year
100 bags on a roll weighs around a kilo

So that means 1100 tonnes of unwanted charity or "charity" plastic bags could be being going straight to landfall every year from Oxford.

Back to hand-wringing and bluster outside the grocers...

(All it would take is by-law)
[quote][p][bold]King Joke[/bold] wrote: THe last idea is a good one Andrew, but your sneering at environmental groups is highly distasteful. Do you enjoy being nasty? I think you'll find most environmental groups would strongly oppose the waste these useless collections generate (in my experience they never turn up) but it's a difficult media management brief criticising a charity, which I imagine is why they keep quiet. I always throw the sacks straight in the bin as soon as they arrive - eventually if the charities realise no-one is donating they will stop this method of collection. I put any unwanted but serviceable goods on Gumtree or Freecycle, and clothes in the clothes bank behind the Folly Bridge Inn.[/p][/quote]Essentially you agree with me then... Green activist groups focus on the clean and easy press-release friendly targets - the urban middle-class grocer and retailer. Steering clear of the complex "untouchable" target of charity or "charity" bags that would potentially result in Facebook, Netmums, Mumsnet or Twitter outrage. The numbers are quite straightforward... Around 4 a week for me is 200 bags a year. Around 55,000 households in Oxford is 11,000,000 bags a year 100 bags on a roll weighs around a kilo So that means 1100 tonnes of unwanted charity or "charity" plastic bags could be being going straight to landfall every year from Oxford. Back to hand-wringing and bluster outside the grocers... (All it would take is by-law) Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 0

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