Owner switches to new electric car from North Oxford BMW garage

thisisoxfordshire: John Ganderton, right, with his new BMW electric car with John Gibbons of BMW North Oxford Garage   Picture OX65436 Simon Williams Buy this photo John Ganderton, right, with his new BMW electric car with John Gibbons of BMW North Oxford Garage Picture OX65436 Simon Williams

THE first electric BMW i3’s have been handed over to happy new owners.

Among the first drivers to pick up one of the newly-launched electric cars from North Oxford BMW Garage, at the Wolvercote Roundabout, on Saturday was John Ganderton.

The 36-year-old garage owner from Buckingham said he and wife Kelly, 35, ordered the car in October before it was officially launched.

He said: “It has been a long wait and there were some nerves at times as to whether we had done the right thing. There is a term for the nerves about how far you can drive before running out of power – called range anxiety.

“But it looks like it is going to work out. It’s a bit of a learning curve because you only have to use one pedal – although the brake is there if you need it.

“But it’s a lot of fun to drive and gives me a lot of pleasure doing it. It’s so quiet, smooth and quick.”

The BMW i3 has two pedals, but the motor provides inertia braking unless you have to stop suddenly.

It has a top speed of 93mph and a range of 80 to 100 miles per charge. It can be fully charged in eight hours from a normal domestic socket.

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4:17am Sat 8 Mar 14

The New Private Eye says...

The thing that worries me is that when electric cars take over from Petrol/Diesel, how much are our electricity bills going to rise (maybe 70% tax and VAT) to compensate for the loss of government revenue on fuel, and how will all the workers at petrol stations find new jobs.There will be no way to tell between domestic only use and car charging at home, so we will all pay. Also without Nuclear Power Stations we will need Wind Turbines on every street corner, and solar panels on every house to generate the Electricity needed. It is all good and well that a few people have these cars and that they are a media darling at the moment, but have the questions even been asked, yet alone answered.
The thing that worries me is that when electric cars take over from Petrol/Diesel, how much are our electricity bills going to rise (maybe 70% tax and VAT) to compensate for the loss of government revenue on fuel, and how will all the workers at petrol stations find new jobs.There will be no way to tell between domestic only use and car charging at home, so we will all pay. Also without Nuclear Power Stations we will need Wind Turbines on every street corner, and solar panels on every house to generate the Electricity needed. It is all good and well that a few people have these cars and that they are a media darling at the moment, but have the questions even been asked, yet alone answered. The New Private Eye
  • Score: 0

9:55am Sun 9 Mar 14

DuncanB says...

The New Private Eye wrote:
The thing that worries me is that when electric cars take over from Petrol/Diesel, how much are our electricity bills going to rise (maybe 70% tax and VAT) to compensate for the loss of government revenue on fuel, and how will all the workers at petrol stations find new jobs.There will be no way to tell between domestic only use and car charging at home, so we will all pay. Also without Nuclear Power Stations we will need Wind Turbines on every street corner, and solar panels on every house to generate the Electricity needed. It is all good and well that a few people have these cars and that they are a media darling at the moment, but have the questions even been asked, yet alone answered.
More likely they will switch to a tax per mile based on a black box inside the car. You can already get insurance that varies based on the distance you drive so taxing vehicles the same way wouldn't be difficult.

The good news is that the we won't need a load of new power stations provided most people charge overnight (which is what electric car drivers already do) there is plenty spare capacity. There are also experiments going on for a 'smart grid' which would allow the grid suppliers to turn non-critical devices (such as car charging) off and on remotely to allow them to balance use of the grid.

Oh, and Oxford Times: it isn't an inertia brake, it's a regenerative braking system. Different things.
[quote][p][bold]The New Private Eye[/bold] wrote: The thing that worries me is that when electric cars take over from Petrol/Diesel, how much are our electricity bills going to rise (maybe 70% tax and VAT) to compensate for the loss of government revenue on fuel, and how will all the workers at petrol stations find new jobs.There will be no way to tell between domestic only use and car charging at home, so we will all pay. Also without Nuclear Power Stations we will need Wind Turbines on every street corner, and solar panels on every house to generate the Electricity needed. It is all good and well that a few people have these cars and that they are a media darling at the moment, but have the questions even been asked, yet alone answered.[/p][/quote]More likely they will switch to a tax per mile based on a black box inside the car. You can already get insurance that varies based on the distance you drive so taxing vehicles the same way wouldn't be difficult. The good news is that the we won't need a load of new power stations provided most people charge overnight (which is what electric car drivers already do) there is plenty spare capacity. There are also experiments going on for a 'smart grid' which would allow the grid suppliers to turn non-critical devices (such as car charging) off and on remotely to allow them to balance use of the grid. Oh, and Oxford Times: it isn't an inertia brake, it's a regenerative braking system. Different things. DuncanB
  • Score: 0

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