Conservation concerns over plan for solar farm

PLANS for a solar farm will be assessed for its impact on Oxford’s green belt.

The plans to install 50,688 solar panels on a field just outside Barton are being proposed by environmental consultancy company ADAS.

Yesterday South Oxfordshire District Council planners ruled an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) was needed. The land, owned by farmer Robert Brooks at Wadley Hill Farm, lies next to Sidlings Copse, a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Slow worms, a lizard-like reptile, live in the woods, and it is known as a site for different habitats, including a reedbed.

District planner Sharon Crawford stated in the report: “The site is not well contained and there will be visual impact, archaeological and nature conservation issues.”

Chairman of Beckley and Stowood Parish Council, David Scott, said the scheme was discussed by the parish council on Thursday evening.

He said: “We think it is right that the EIA is taking place. We will wait and see now if a full application is submitted.”

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:59pm Sat 12 Jan 13

xjohnx says...

You can't see the view in the dark.
You can't see the view in the dark. xjohnx

2:33am Sun 13 Jan 13

Grunden Skip says...

This is brilliant, the NIMBYS who campaign against these "green" power generating applications, are also the same types that campaign against nuclear power stations. So what is it that you want? Green energy as long as it is not generated near you?. This country has got no chance of progressing into the 21st century until idiot protesters are ignored, and we just get on with building everything from power stations and homes, to new roads and rail lines.
This is brilliant, the NIMBYS who campaign against these "green" power generating applications, are also the same types that campaign against nuclear power stations. So what is it that you want? Green energy as long as it is not generated near you?. This country has got no chance of progressing into the 21st century until idiot protesters are ignored, and we just get on with building everything from power stations and homes, to new roads and rail lines. Grunden Skip

1:35am Mon 14 Jan 13

Myron Blatz says...

Farmers wouldn't be changing to solar panel plantations without UK or EU subsidies and the promise of high yield returns from selling to the National Grid. However, maybe there is 'eco-sense' in getting domestic homes and commercial premises to generate more of the electricity which they consume via solar panels on their roofs. All private and Council-owned houses, flats and buildings could have solar panels, and whilst initially expensive, this could be eased by Government help and reflected in the sale-price of homes - with home-owners having to take a short-term 'hit' on costs against profit on re-sale. It would also be easier to vector solar panels into the cost of new homes in the same way as double-glazing and insulation has become over the past couple of decades. Home-owners and Council Tenants alike would reap the benefit of not having to pay ever-spiralling electricity bills from ever-greedier electricity companies (thanks, Mrs Thatcher!) and at least solar panels on a 'semi' would have less impact on the countryside and neighbourhoods than stonking-great windmills in the back-garden!
Farmers wouldn't be changing to solar panel plantations without UK or EU subsidies and the promise of high yield returns from selling to the National Grid. However, maybe there is 'eco-sense' in getting domestic homes and commercial premises to generate more of the electricity which they consume via solar panels on their roofs. All private and Council-owned houses, flats and buildings could have solar panels, and whilst initially expensive, this could be eased by Government help and reflected in the sale-price of homes - with home-owners having to take a short-term 'hit' on costs against profit on re-sale. It would also be easier to vector solar panels into the cost of new homes in the same way as double-glazing and insulation has become over the past couple of decades. Home-owners and Council Tenants alike would reap the benefit of not having to pay ever-spiralling electricity bills from ever-greedier electricity companies (thanks, Mrs Thatcher!) and at least solar panels on a 'semi' would have less impact on the countryside and neighbourhoods than stonking-great windmills in the back-garden! Myron Blatz

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree